Home care

Do not attempt to treat an eye injury at home if the child cannot easily open the eye. Place a soft bandage over the eye, and see your doctor promptly.

Do not attempt to treat at home if the child has any of the following symptoms: bleeding from or in the eyeball; differences in the size or color of the pupils; differences in the color or position of the irises; any collapse of the eyeball; or blurring of vision. If any of these symptoms appear, place a soft bandage over the eye, and see your doctor promptly.

Do not attempt to remove a fishhook or any other object that has penetrated the eye. See a doctor immediately.

If a harmful liquid or powder enters the eye (acids, alkalis, caustics, petrol), immediate action is essential. Seconds count! Hold the eye open, and flush it with several pints of cool water. If possible, put your child into a cool shower, clothes and all, and wash out the eye. Then immediately take the child to your doctor for further care.

If none of the above signs is present and you see a speck on the eyeball or under the lid (and the child is cooperative), you may try to remove the speck by gentle strokes with a cotton swab. If the speck does not immediately come off, stop. The object may be embedded. See a doctor.

Precautions

• Be cautious about treating eye injuries yourself.

• Some golf balls explode if they are unwound and can cause eye injuries. Do not let young children play with golf balls, and do not allow anyone to unwind them.

• Beware! Aerosol spray cans and carbon dioxide cartridges explode violently in fires or in extreme heat. Be sure your child knows this.

• Machine sanders, paint removers, and grindstones throw off particles that can injure the eyes. Anyone around these machines should wear protective glasses. Keep children far away from such machines.

Medical treatment

A doctor can easily anaesthetize the eye and examine it internally and externally without pain or damage. Your doctor may stain the eyeball with drops to make small injuries and foreign objects readily visible. Areas inside and outside of the eye can be examined with a special microscope.

*68/84/5*

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